The Montessori Teacher

“The teacher, when she begins to work in our schools, must have a kind of faith that the child will reveal himself through work. She must free herself from all preconceived ideas concerning the levels at which the children may be.

The many different types of children . . . must not worry her. . . . The teacher must believe that this child before her will show his true nature when he finds a piece of work that attracts him. So what must she look out for? That one child or another will begin to concentrate”

– (Maria Montessori (1949) The Absorbent Mind).

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Montessori teachers are not the centre of attention in the classroom. Their role centres on the preparation and organisation of learning materials to meet the needs and interests of the children. The focus is on children learning, not on teachers teaching.

One of the most notable differences between Montessori teachers and traditional teachers is the enormous trust Montessori teachers place in the developmental abilities of the children. The teacher creates an atmosphere of calm, order and joy in the classroom and is there to help and encourage the children in all their efforts, allowing them to develop self-confidence and inner discipline. Knowing how to observe constructively and when, and how much, to intervene, is one of the most important talents of the Montessori teacher.

Montessori teachers are not the centre of attention in the classroom. Their role centres on the preparation and organisation of learning materials to meet the needs and interests of the children. The focus is on children learning, not on teachers teaching.